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Old 05-02-2010, 11:25 PM   #1
jgreen827
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Default help modeling a chair and typewriter

I am recreating a scene from the movie Schindler's List for a class project that I am currently working on. The goal of the assignment is to model the scene exactly how it appears to look on screen. I'm currently trying to model all of the props in the scene, and still being fairly new to Maya, I am unsure about how to go about modeling the wooden chair and the typewriter. If anyone has any advice on how to help me it would be much appreciated. Also, please comment if you have any feedback on how my work looks so far. Thanks.



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Old 06-02-2010, 04:15 AM   #2
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The chair is fairly easy. The seat and legs and other members are cylinders. The back is just two cv curves with the face of two cylinders extruded along the curves.

The typewriter is a bit of a modeling project in itself as there are clearly lots of elements to it visible in the scene. I would start by searching google images for similar typewriter references of the era and model it out.

I can't offer more just now as I in the middle of upgrading my modeling machine from vista to windows 7. I can check again tomorrow with maybe to screen shots to help you out.
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Old 07-02-2010, 06:41 AM   #3
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I really like how you are paying attention to detail like the angle and placement of things in relation to other things if that makes sense.

I agree with ctbram. Use cv curve tool to draw a curve and then extrude a circle or the face of a cylinder along the curve. That typewriter is going to be a pain in the butt I think if you are somewhat new to modeling. My suggestion is to look at it one small detail at a time, before you know it, the whole thing will be done. Reference pics like ctbram suggested is a must. That way you can find pictures of similar typewrites so you can see the details of it better.

just in case you were done modeling the light..there is a hinge to allow the light head to adjust that you didn't model.

Keep up the good work...it's really looking good.
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Old 07-02-2010, 12:00 PM   #4
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Here is a quick and dirty version of the chair([1] no wire; smoothed; [2] wire; not smoothed).

I was too lazy to adjust the number of segments on the cylinders cap I use to extrude the back loops along a curve and the segments and spans in the torus I used for the leg support hoop, so these are more dense then they need to be.



and here is the .ma file...
Attached Files
File Type: rar chair_04.rar (86.7 KB, 28 views)
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Old 07-02-2010, 03:54 PM   #5
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What school are you going to for 3d modeling? I just started school last week for 3d/vfx and Im excited to really understand everything I can do with 3d modeling/animating as well as learning about particles and mel script.

Your pic looks good so far. The back cabinet and tables edges looks like it might have a bevel on them in the real pic. The typewriter does look tough to do.
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Old 07-02-2010, 04:37 PM   #6
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Here is an overlay of your scene and the reference image with some notes on things I think you may want to adjust.

1-4] there is a pillar, molding, board (I think), and sign on the wall to the far left.

5] stool and table against far wall seem to tall.

6] second level of the table on the far wall seems thicker in the reference

7] the hinge at the back of the desk lamp is missing

8] overall scale of the scene is taller then the reference and some of the scaling issues may be caused by perspective based on focal length and position of the locked down camera for the scene. The things circled in green show the camera angle discrepancy between your scene and the reference image. You can see the windows, the board on the far wall, the lights, the stool, ..., are all stretched up and shifted left.

9] books missing

10] little nits - There is also what looks to be a coffee or tea pot, cup, and container on the lhs of the table on the far wall that need to be modeled. They are all pretty simple shapes though.

It's a very good start with proxy quality models. You will need to add some bevels to avoid the razor sharp CG looking edges. Very little in nature is razor sharp and razor sharp edges are the very first thing that give away CG images.

Your blocking out of the shapes though and scale, with the exception of the couple things mentioned above is a very good start though.



perfecto on this site has done some magnificent work modeling a home office scene and he includes lots of wire frame shots so you can see how his models are built and bevels were done.

check out his wip link here http://srv01.simply3dworld.com/showt...threadid=33604
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Old 07-02-2010, 09:15 PM   #7
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Is this how a lot of export 3d modelers started by modeling offices and pics of this nature? Im just curious because Ive only been using Maya for about 4 or 5 months and Ive been doing different tutorials and references and more organic modeling and Im always looking to get better every chance I get.
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Old 08-02-2010, 01:23 AM   #8
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Reference images and tutorials are the best place to start.

Tutorials teach workflow and workflow is critical to using the software efficiently.

Working from references (w/orthogonal views) as you are learning to model will help you to more accurately gauge size and proportion.

As you continue to develop model from 3/4 views and photographic references (like the chair image above). From what I have been told, in real studio environments you rarely get nice clean orthogonal references so eventually you either have to draw them yourself or learn to work from the concept art which is usually non-orthogonal.
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Old 10-02-2010, 03:21 PM   #9
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Just wanted to thank you all for your advice as it has been very helpful.

joemilkweed: i got to UCF and its there Visual Language major under digital media (basically animation and game design).
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Old 13-02-2010, 08:43 PM   #10
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So this is where I am at now. The next part for me is lighting the scene. If anyone has any suggestions on what they think would be the best way go about getting the most accurate lighting for the scene please let me know.

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