Maya Training

Introduction to Hard Surface Modeling

Maya Training

Interiors and Furniture Vol 1 & 2 - Modeling & Cloth

Maya Training

Shading, Lighting and Rendering the Bedroom in MR

Maya Training

Robot volume one - Modeling with animation in mind

Maya Training

Spach-Alspaugh House the complete courseware

Maya Training

Burt The Cartoon Dinosaur Vol 01 - Modeling

New Maya Training

Robot Volume 02 - Hybrid Rigging
You are here > Home > SimplyMaya Community Forums
Loading

Welcome to Simply Maya

Please Sign in or Sign up for an account

Member Login

Lost your password?

Not a member yet? Sign Up!

Old 29-11-2005, 11:04 AM   #1
j5ive
Subscriber
 
j5ive's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Sunny Ol' Wigan, UK
Posts: 752
Thanks: 0
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Default High poly to low poly baking?

Roughly how long could it take to bake down the details of a high poly model to a low? The reason I'm asking is I'm in work, and not only shouldn't be doing this but don't fancy baking if I have to leave my computer processing alone all day.

Thanks.

Baking down from 20,000 to 5,000
__________________
If you believe in telekinesis, raise my right hand.
j5ive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-11-2005, 04:07 PM   #2
vladimirjp
Subscriber
 
vladimirjp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: stuck in the 90's boston, USA
Posts: 1,871
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Default

thats not much at all.
from 20k to 5k.
it should not take long to bake this using the transfer surface tool in maya.
also baking depends on your map size u are baking out to, and amount of samples.
there are other 3rd party utilities for making normal maps, and surface info

soemthing like this http://www.unrealtechnology.com/scre..._creation2.jpg

to this http://www.unrealtechnology.com/scre..._creation1.jpg

that might take a while to transfer....
__________________
Image dump
vladimirjp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-11-2005, 04:18 PM   #3
j5ive
Subscriber
 
j5ive's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Sunny Ol' Wigan, UK
Posts: 752
Thanks: 0
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Default

wow, I guess when compared to 2,000,000 polys mine should be a walk in the park so to speak.
__________________
If you believe in telekinesis, raise my right hand.
j5ive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-11-2005, 01:34 AM   #4
Nusirilo
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 121
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Now what does polygon baking mean, if you dont mind me asking? Also, in the image samples that you gave, was the 5000 poly model used in the game? If so, isn't it somewhat low detail?

Thanks.
__________________
Nusirilo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-11-2005, 02:46 AM   #5
vladimirjp
Subscriber
 
vladimirjp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: stuck in the 90's boston, USA
Posts: 1,871
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Default

yea 5k is low poly, but considering the amount of poly in the high rez and advances in the unreal 3 engine this was the final in game demo result
http://www.unrealtechnology.com/scre..._creation3.jpg

baking surface info from one mesh to another is when u normal map a character, or transfer UV info, or shape info etc... this vary from 3d package to 3d package.
__________________
Image dump
vladimirjp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-11-2005, 03:05 AM   #6
Phopojijo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 408
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Originally posted by Nusirilo
Now what does polygon baking mean, if you dont mind me asking? Also, in the image samples that you gave, was the 5000 poly model used in the game? If so, isn't it somewhat low detail?

Thanks.
Technically the 5000 poly model was used in the game...

http://www.unrealtechnology.com/scre..._creation3.jpg

That's what it looked like. Basically what happens is the low poly mesh gets textured with a normal map. Every pixel on the screen gets individually lit -- and if it touches a section of a normal mapped model... it doesn't take the lighting data from the flat surface. Oh no my friend, it grabs the surface normal in the normal map and sees which way its pointed.

Basically what you're doing is gently nudging the light vector off-angle to adjust its brightness... and the lighting data is taken from the high-poly mesh. If the polygon's pointed at you, but the normal map says that texel's normal is pointed down and right, it adjusts the brightness accordingly.

And yes -- all smart engine programmers take into account texel shifts... don't worry about your color map being shifted around.

Last edited by Phopojijo : 30-11-2005 at 03:08 AM.
Phopojijo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-11-2005, 02:15 PM   #7
Nusirilo
Subscriber
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 121
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Wow, I hope I don't have to use that technique for a while, because to be honest, I barely understand what you just said because of all the jargon hehe.
__________________
Nusirilo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2005, 06:33 PM   #8
Phopojijo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 408
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Originally posted by Nusirilo
Wow, I hope I don't have to use that technique for a while, because to be honest, I barely understand what you just said because of all the jargon hehe.
Its easier to do than to explain. Basically the point is the geometry in game is NOT the geometry used to light and shadow.

Apart from the edges -- people will see the high-poly model... but it doesn't need to render all those polygons.
Phopojijo is offline   Reply With Quote

A little bit about who we are
Links you might find useful
Catch up with SimplyMaya
SimplyMaya specialises in Maya tutorials. We offer over 1,000 individual Maya training videos, ranging from basic Maya tutorials through to intermediate Maya tutorials. Our tutorials are created by instructors with industry experience and are designed to get you up and running in Maya quickly without making it seem like hard work.

Copyright © 1999-2015 SimplyMaya - vBulletinŽ Copyright © 2000-2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.