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Old 15-06-2007, 07:15 AM   #1
Altadena
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Default Upgrading Laptop?

is it possible to upgrade a dell laptop's video card and procesor
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Old 15-06-2007, 12:14 PM   #2
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Anything is possible, but practical, i wouldn't say so....upgrading any laptop is more of a hassle, than if you were to just buy a new one. You're better off spending the extra dough for a new one you can personalize.
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Old 15-06-2007, 06:55 PM   #3
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Depends which one to be honest.
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Old 16-06-2007, 07:02 PM   #4
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I'm very certain that laptops can't be upgraded since most of them have the cpu and gpu soldered onto the mainboard.
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Old 16-06-2007, 07:06 PM   #5
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Nah, depending on the laptop you can, mine for example will let you upgrage the processor, graphics, RAM, tells you how to in the instructions
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Old 17-06-2007, 02:00 AM   #6
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just get one of these mate \/
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gimme.
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Old 17-06-2007, 12:10 PM   #7
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Thats what Ive got lol.

the M1710.

Your right though Architect a lot of them are soldered in.
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Old 17-06-2007, 03:36 PM   #8
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After I saw some pics describing the process of upgrading the cpu in a Dell M1710, I can't help but wonder why is everone praising it. I'm sure its performs pretty well, but the variant of the Core 2 that Dell uses doesn't even have a intergrated heatsink and the cpu socket doesn't even have its own load plate. Could you really trust this setup?
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Old 17-06-2007, 05:40 PM   #9
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Originally posted by The Architect
After I saw some pics describing the process of upgrading the cpu in a Dell M1710, I can't help but wonder why is everone praising it. I'm sure its performs pretty well, but the variant of the Core 2 that Dell uses doesn't even have a intergrated heatsink and the cpu socket doesn't even have its own load plate. Could you really trust this setup?
One word, after using one heavily for a number of months, day in and day out, yes.

Ive never had a problem with it (running batch renders at 100% on both cores for about a week), no probs.

I doubt that its been thrown together without testing and thought, and i'm sure that the people that designed the CPU/Socket are a bit more experianced at CPU, and chipset desing than us mere mortals
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Old 17-06-2007, 07:44 PM   #10
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gster123 > 'I doubt that its been thrown together without testing and thought, and i'm sure that the people that designed the CPU/Socket are a bit more experianced at CPU, and chipset desing than us mere mortals'

I'm no expert on these matters but what I do know is that laptops have a tendency to break really easily.

A friend who gave me a old P3 laptop that didn't work and when I opened it up, the chip (without intergrated heatsink of course) had a chip in it caused by the heat pipe plate. When you look at the M1710 setup you sometimes wonder just how durable it is. I mean, the socket doesn't has no load plate! What mysterious methods does it use to ensure the chip doesn't move around?
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Old 17-06-2007, 09:54 PM   #11
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Dunno?? maybe PFM? But if its a motherboard, designed for a laptop, with a chip designed for a laptop, i would assume that the designers would have thought about the durability and made it suitable for its usage (otherwise i'm sure they would be in the brown stuff if its a design fault, that dosent make if fit for purpose of said nature) and the chips been abut for a bit and is used in lots of other systems (Mac's I think have the same method) and theres not been a big spate of problems it wouuld point to it being fine.

I think laptops migt have a tendancy to break as when people get used to carrying them form place to place, they tend to throw them about a bit and also dont give them decent protection when moving them about, i.e they will pay £1000 for a laptop and £20 on a bag for said laptop.
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