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Old 05-01-2010, 01:32 AM   #1
Jr.Who
 
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Default Learning Japanese

Hey guys,

Been a long time since I've been on the forums. I've started college and have been busy with some other things.

Anyway, straight to the main point of my post: should I continue to learn Japanese?

I've been learning it sparingly on and off for about 3 years, although not all of that was a waste. I have learned a lot about learning languages. The thing is I'm starting to question if it's that important for me to learn. I'm majoring in Game Art & Design and I will probably always live in America (unless I retire and move to Italy lol). I would like to visit Japan though. The thing is I've heard that a lot of Japanese people understand English.

I'm thinking about switching to learning Italian. I was going to do this after learning Japanese. I would definitely enjoy doing Italian more, but I wanted to learn Japanese because it is a business language. The thing is, will it really be that useful for me to learn?

Thanks,
Steven Palmesano
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Old 05-01-2010, 01:43 AM   #2
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I work for a Japanese company here in america, called Fujitsu. We make self check out machines, not quite a dream job and definitely not a 3d job. We at one time had 3 Japanese guys come to visit our factory and do some work here for about 3 months. Within the first 2 weeks me a couple friends and the japanese guys would go out for drinks after work or on weekends and hang out. They learned english VERY QUICK. Bridge words needed to be cut out of sentences though at first. Then by the time they left I think they spoke better english than most american's I've met. Cool guys... they loved to drink and hike so they had a lot of fun with me and my friends (who also work with me). Man I miss those guys.

Not sure this helps but I wanted to share that just in case.
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Old 05-01-2010, 04:51 AM   #3
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Exactly, cause they're so much smarter than us! :p
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Old 05-01-2010, 04:56 AM   #4
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I think you should continue learning Japanese, as it's one of the biggest technological superpowers. The 3d industry is staggeringly large as well there.

I've been learning the language for around 3 years as well, and am just about to pick it up again as well.

Italian is good as well, and (probably) easier to learn than most other languages. You need to put into perspective what you will use the language for.
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Old 05-01-2010, 07:43 AM   #5
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Chinese is more of a business language. I say go for Italian. Also, where on Earth are you going to College?
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Old 05-01-2010, 09:12 AM   #6
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I lived in Japan for a little over a year. I was in a fairly rural area and when i arrived i spoke no Japanese, but got on fine. I went to classes over there and learned a bit, but some people i know never learned any. They could manage no problem.
If you go to somewhere like Tokyo people will speak to you in English. They will be impressed you are trying, but will still speak to you in English.
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Old 05-01-2010, 09:24 AM   #7
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If your getting on with it ok so far why not carry it on??

Seems a shame to drop something if you enjoy it.
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Old 05-01-2010, 02:16 PM   #8
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Akirame naide! - Don't give up!

3 years of "hard" work gone? That doesn't seem the best choise at all.

If you can continue to learn japanese, do it, then learn italian too.



I'm also learning japanese, but i only started a few months ago, also learning when i have free time or a cool head for it.


(i'm such a shamless guy.... registed for months in here and my first reply is this XD)
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Old 05-01-2010, 03:18 PM   #9
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Originally posted by NextDesign
Italian is good as well, and (probably) easier to learn than most other languages. You need to put into perspective what you will use the language for.
Italian does seem a lot easier to me than Japanese, and I seem to be able to pick it up faster. I'd probably use Japanese if the game company I will one day hopefully work for needed someone that spoke Japanese, but the thing is most Japanese businessmen speak English! I want to learn Italian because… well, I'm Italian! It would help a little with my genealogy search and some of my family is starting to learn Italian too.

Originally posted by Joopson
Chinese is more of a business language. I say go for Italian. Also, where on Earth are you going to College?
Yeah, but not for the game industry. I go to The Illinois Institute of Art in Chicago. Fun stuff, bro. lol

Originally posted by hammer.horror
I lived in Japan for a little over a year. I was in a fairly rural area and when i arrived i spoke no Japanese, but got on fine. I went to classes over there and learned a bit, but some people i know never learned any. They could manage no problem.
If you go to somewhere like Tokyo people will speak to you in English. They will be impressed you are trying, but will still speak to you in English.
See, that's my main point. If I did visit Japan, I'd definitely pick up, but not at the level I'm at now. I'd probably go for more of a "Japanese For Travelers" level than Rosetta Stone all the way.

Originally posted by gster123
If your getting on with it ok so far why not carry it on??

Seems a shame to drop something if you enjoy it.
The thing is I'm not getting on with it ok. I haven't studied it in a while (almost 4 months!). And I don't enjoy it all the time. It's hard to teach yourself a language, but Japanese just makes it worse with all their rules and special things.

Originally posted by DJProfK
Akirame naide! - Don't give up!

3 years of "hard" work gone? That doesn't seem the best choise at all.

If you can continue to learn japanese, do it, then learn italian too.

I'm also learning japanese, but i only started a few months ago, also learning when i have free time or a cool head for it.
I don't know if it was necessarily hard work, since I was learning it on and off and never found myself committed to it for a long time. :blush: I'm not bashing Japanese in any way, I'm just wondering which would be better for me to do.
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Old 05-01-2010, 03:32 PM   #10
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End of the day it seems more of a hobby from what your saying, so if its a hobby that you dont like anymore and dont get any sense of accheivement out of it then dont do it, if its the otherway around then keep it up when you get chance.

You could always start Italian and see how you go (kinda playing guitar and going to bass) if you get on with it i'm sure that your japanese will still be there, just a little rusty, so ring the changes.

Whats that saying "A change is as good as a rest"?

Hey forgot to say, good to see you back mate. Will you be posting any work up that you've been up to??

Hope so.

Take care

Steve
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Old 05-01-2010, 04:31 PM   #11
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Originally posted by gster123
End of the day it seems more of a hobby from what your saying, so if its a hobby that you dont like anymore and dont get any sense of accheivement out of it then dont do it, if its the otherway around then keep it up when you get chance.

You could always start Italian and see how you go (kinda playing guitar and going to bass) if you get on with it i'm sure that your japanese will still be there, just a little rusty, so ring the changes.

Whats that saying "A change is as good as a rest"?

Hey forgot to say, good to see you back mate. Will you be posting any work up that you've been up to??

Hope so.

Take care

Steve
Thanks for the advice!

I haven't been up to any 3D work lately. My first quarter in college was mostly foundation stuff. This coming quarter, which I start on the 12th, I will start getting into my core program. As far as 3D work… I don't think I get into that till my fourth quarter. I'll post some of my 2D work on my site soon, hopefully. I'm thinking of redesigning it before I update it.
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Old 05-01-2010, 06:24 PM   #12
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Dude, I've been learning Japanese on and off for the past 5 years; I am obsessed with Anime, and have to watch it subbed.

For me, watching it subbed is a great help because you are listening to the language and reading; you start to recognize the odd work here and there, then phrases. For me, this is a delightful and enjoyable way of picking up parts of the language without having to concentrate on trying to learn it!

Another thing I have found very helpful are "instant immersion" audio disks; there is very little English spoken on it, hence the "immersion" I put them on in the car on my way to and from work; again I find myself learning without even thinking too hard!

Just thought you'd like to know about those 2 "methods" I have used.

I've Italian blood too; from my Nonno. I have always been a little gutted that I never had the language passed down from my dad. Even tho I'd love to learn Italian I am so obsessed with Japanese culture, etc. that I am determined to learn the language!

Why not learn still learn both languages? If you know people who can speak Italian, then all the better; you can continue to learn Japanese the way you have been and, if they don't mind of course, always speak in Italian to those who already can fluently.

I think I'll leave it there! Lol! Or I'll just babble on more!

Gambatte!
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Old 06-01-2010, 02:08 AM   #13
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Originally posted by otaku_kiru
Why not learn still learn both languages?
Because I don't know if I'd really use Japanese all that much.
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Old 06-01-2010, 02:14 AM   #14
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Originally posted by Jr.Who
I don't know if it was necessarily hard work, since I was learning it on and off and never found myself committed to it for a long time. :blush: I'm not bashing Japanese in any way, I'm just wondering which would be better for me to do. [/b]
Hehe, no, i didnt meant it that way. I meanted to say that evan tough you're looking foward to start a new thing, you shouldn't give up what you're doing now.

While i can't say you'll end up "using" japanese, one thing is for sure, you expanded your knowledge, wich is more that many have done in their lifes, and you'll have something to tell your kids later on (or brag on the internetz, what ever suits you best ).

Or... who knows.. maybe you're like otaku_kiru here and me, you just don't know it yet

Anime/manga fwd ^^


(if you're really feeling frustrated about learning japanese, take a break, just try to give it another go later on, knowing a little more is always rewarding)



Originally posted by Jr.Who
Because I don't know if I'd really use Japanese all that much.
If we look at all the stuff we learned at school when we were kids, we see that we know stuff that will never end up using by miles. So uhh.... look what i said above

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Old 06-01-2010, 10:43 AM   #15
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Originally posted by Jr.Who
I want to learn Italian because… well, I'm Italian!
i never could understand that reason.

from what i heard if you just pick up japanese from anime then all the native speakers will be like 'what are you trying to say?'
but then that person might have just been a hater of anime but lover of japanese...
or maybe japanese people really dont speak like the way they do in anime

i think gster's got a good point

and i think italian is easier to learn than japanese because it's closer to english? (more importantly you can read what they write )
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