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Old 29-06-2005, 07:58 PM   #16
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For you demo reel you should look at it from the perspective of an employer. Ask yourself, if I were employing me, would I do so on this work/reel? And be honest. Also remember that your reel is only as good as the ‘worst’ piece on it.

I think that many people, including me (well, not as much now) are too scared to re start a project as they’ve put so much effort into it. They may know it’s not up to scratch, but are unwilling to accept it, and try to simply work around it, when in fact it’s the foundation of the work that incorrect so no polishing will improve it significantly.

If you did the same project 5 times, compare the first with the fifth. There WILL be an improvement. It’s almost a guarantee.

Basically don’t get too attached to your work, especially as your learning. You find it easier to take criticism, and easier to scrap it and restart if it goes way of course.
Yeah, but no but yeah but no....
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Old 30-06-2005, 07:39 AM   #17
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its hard to find a nice balance - but for example..when I was learning guitar i played for peopel they would say "hey thats comming along" now I knew It was shite but it gave me encouragement. I knew what I wanted to hear - and I guess as long as you look at your work and see where you want it to be then thats great.

Sometime though crits are hard to take - but if it is nessesery (due to it being a job) then you have to take it on the chin and learn from it. Dave here always used to crit my work but in the end it helped me - we have an understanding where we know we are not being a-holes but simply honest.
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Old 30-06-2005, 11:21 AM   #18
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The jedi fighter texturs are all painted no shaders...

Just read that some where in the thread.=)

I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination, knowledge is limited, imagination encircles the world. (Albert Einstein)
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Old 30-06-2005, 12:49 PM   #19
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true kurt but there's still a lot to be done in the shader to get the metal look.

I think it's a good thing that someone said this to you so early on. I never really had someone sayin gthat to me back in the day and I wish they had. Now at work if something looks crap believe me i get told it loks crap!!! Take it with a pince of salt but also take it as yeah maybe this isn't good enough. An F22 is a big texturing project to make it look good. You can't just do it with shaders you will have to paint maps as well. My suggestion is to start smaller, for example try to just get a curved poly plane looking like it came from an F22. e.g. the spec highlight , diffuse etc all look good. Paint some maps for it and learn how to apply them and tweak them etc. Don't bite off more than you can chew

but most of all KEEP TRYING you never stop learning!

Technical Director - Framestore

Currently working on: Your Highness

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