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Old 30-08-2005, 04:25 PM   #1
Nusirilo
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Default Question about 3D art and drawing

I just noticed that a lot of 3D art work can be completed much more easily with reference drawings to work from. Does this mean that if I wanted to take up 3D animation as a career once I finish highschool, that I would need to have drawing skills? I hope that these two are not dependent on one another, as I am a shoddy artist when it comes to drawing, but really like 3D animation.
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Old 30-08-2005, 05:09 PM   #2
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No, these skills are not dependent on each other, but do certainly compliment each other. Working form references does generally make modeling more accurate, but there is nothing that says the modeler must make they're own references.
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Old 30-08-2005, 08:23 PM   #3
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Take it from someone who absolutely can't draw....it's not necessary..but it sure wouldn't have bothered me to have been able to draw when we were storyboarding in school (and it would have been nice to have DRAWN a better character that I wanted to use for my demo reel)...lol...but no one I've talked to has not been good at 3d animation because they couldn't draw....you just need to have a passion for 3d animation...good luck
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Old 30-08-2005, 10:49 PM   #4
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I would certainly advise you to take up a fine art/life drawing class. Animation is essentially observation and life drawing is a great way to perfect this skill.

You really need reference images of some sort to produce decent work (maybe if your really good you can wing it, I doubt it though). You can find some ref’s around on the net but if you have your own designs then your gonna need to draw them out. Even if there just sketches for your own reference, it good to know a bit.

Having a basic knowledge of traditional art WILL help you with every aspect; you can be assured of that. I cant think of one reason why anyone shouldn’t learn the fundamentals.

Here’s a sentence from a article about why it good to go to school to study 3D:

1. Basic Training
It is very obvious to me while browsing the 3d forums of the net that there is an overwhelming lack of the basic art principals in the majority of the 3d community. Image after image contains no thought to its composition, color choices, or design setup. Ok 3d is left looking mediocre at best. Just some changes in composition and lighting would have dramatic effects on the resulting images and animations. I think basic art knowledge is paramount to artists today, but unfortunately missing from the majority of them. There are just too many people out there trying to get your job to not understand the fundamentals. Once you learn them they will help you in every aspect from color choices on your texture sheet to camera placement.
Heed that

I personally agree with that statement, so much so I kinda temporally gave up learning 3D to focus on classical animation, graphics design and drawing. Software is easy to pick up, I want to spend my education learning the real skills.

That’s not to say you can’t get good without these skills, but you’ll be much better with them. As I said, cant think of any reason not to learn to draw… ANYONE can learn.
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Old 31-08-2005, 12:11 AM   #5
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Originally posted by doodle
I would certainly advise you to take up a fine art/life drawing class. Animation is essentially observation and life drawing is a great way to perfect this skill.

You really need reference images of some sort to produce decent work (maybe if your really good you can wing it, I doubt it though). You can find some ref’s around on the net but if you have your own designs then your gonna need to draw them out. Even if there just sketches for your own reference, it good to know a bit.

Having a basic knowledge of traditional art WILL help you with every aspect; you can be assured of that. I cant think of one reason why anyone shouldn’t learn the fundamentals.

Here’s a sentence from a article about why it good to go to school to study 3D:



Heed that

I personally agree with that statement, so much so I kinda temporally gave up learning 3D to focus on classical animation, graphics design and drawing. Software is easy to pick up, I want to spend my education learning the real skills.

That’s not to say you can’t get good without these skills, but you’ll be much better with them. As I said, cant think of any reason not to learn to draw… ANYONE can learn.
Sounds like good advice. However, you say that anyone can learn to draw. Can anyone learn how to draw well? I have never been a great drawer (if that is a word in this sense) and have therefore tried to stray away from anything to do with drawing. Would taking a traditional art course in high school truly make a big difference? If so, I may have to give consideration to that. It always frustrates me, though, because I always feel that people who can draw well are generally born with that skill, or at least the majority of that skill. Is this not true?
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Old 31-08-2005, 01:18 AM   #6
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I don't believe anyone is born with any skills other drooling and soiling themselves. Certainly people have certain aptitudes and may pick certain things up quicker than others, but (barring any nuerological problems) anyone can be trained a skill with the proper devotion of time and effort.
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Old 31-08-2005, 09:10 AM   #7
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Well you dont have to draw perfect to be a good animator but it will help you if you can draw different poses on the paper.
Some very ruff skatches will do much to see how some character looks like in different poses!

Sense for timing and acting (especialy for expressions) is needed to create beleviable character.

So, when something will happen and how it will happen,action and reaction...

talent and training just like in every aspect of life

Good luck!
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Old 31-08-2005, 04:41 PM   #8
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Originally posted by Nusirilo
Sounds like good advice. However, you say that anyone can learn to draw. Can anyone learn how to draw well? I have never been a great drawer (if that is a word in this sense) and have therefore tried to stray away from anything to do with drawing. Would taking a traditional art course in high school truly make a big difference? If so, I may have to give consideration to that. It always frustrates me, though, because I always feel that people who can draw well are generally born with that skill, or at least the majority of that skill. Is this not true?
Well i heard a quote that it take thousends of bad drawings to get to the good ones.

So the key is to just draw. It may be rubbish, so try again, and keep trying and eventually you'll pick it up and you can get very good. Yes, some people just "have it", other dont but that dosn't mean you can't become really good.

Me... i certainly wasn't great (and still arn't) but i have seen improvements in my drawings and i am starting to get that "eye"

Try looking at "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" by Dr. Betty Edwards. Basically it trains you to independently work the right side of the brain, without interferance from the left side, as you should only be drawing with the right side.

Basically the theory is as follows:

Betty Edwards has used the terms L-Mode and R-Mode to designate two ways of knowing and seeing - the verbal, analytic mode and the visual, perceptual mode - no matter where they are located in the individual brain. You are probably aware of these different characteristics. L-mode is a step-by-step style of thinking, using words, numbers and other symbols. L-mode strings things out in sequences, like words in a sentence. R-mode on the other hand, uses visual information and processes, not step-by-step, but all at once, like recognizing the face of a friend.

Most activities require both modes, each contributing its special functions, but a few activities require mainly one mode, without interference from the other. Drawing is one of these activities.

Learning to draw, then, turns out not to be "learning to draw." Paradoxically, "learning to draw" means learning to make a mental shift from L-mode to R-mode. That is what a person trained in drawing does, and that is what you can learn.
http://www.drawright.com/

So when drawing with the "left side" you tend to draw that you think you see, insted of that is actually there. You almost break down that your drawing and dont see it as one.
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