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Old 11-11-2010, 11:57 AM   #1
ben hobden
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Default Talking Compositing (and getting a headache)

Wow.

I have been doing that Nuke Workshop recently, inbetween working on the Hind and bits, and I have to say, I dont think I was really prepared for what was involved. I guess I saw it beforehand as something of an extension of 3d/2d, and that it might even be somewhat easier knowing what I already know, but....I did not anticipate what a whole different kettle of fish it would be. Between the lecture notes and videos from the workshop Im doing, some of the course notes on FXPHD (which Im considering doing in the new year) and other reading material, it really is asking me to use a whole different part of my brain that I usually dont.

This is the third CG workshop I have done this year, and none have asked me to truly study and concentrate like this one. You often hear dont you, about the balance between art and science, and how software is created with one or the other in mind. I think never has that dichotomy seemed more clear to me than in learning Nuke. Im findng it really is Science/math before art.

Perhaps it is the node based structure that is throwing me off. I think since I started learning about CGI two and a half years ago, this is the most challenging thing Ive ever done.
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Old 11-11-2010, 12:17 PM   #2
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what are you finding difficult?

...btw, maya is a node based structure
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Old 11-11-2010, 12:44 PM   #3
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Yeah, I thought I might get pulled up on that. But I dont really create too many intricate shaders, or too complex animations, I mean, I know, Maya is, essentially, oh whats the saying...''a collection of nodes working with each other in..." I forget.... but I dont think of it really in those terms...whereas in Nuke the node graph is permanently open and most of what you do you do through it.

Like, this week, the course is looking at channel management. Compositing elements through the merge node. There's one route where each element is seperate, so it's one merge node to merge say diffuse and specular, and you set the operation of the merge node to the required. Then another merge node for the next element and so on. Then theres another route where its a multi layered exr file...so you're taking the output of different channels and feeding them back into itself through other channels, with different merge operations...etc. It's the science of different file formats. I think this is the part Im finding most daunting. When I use Maya Im only interested in whats inside the file. But when compositing, you have to really understand the differences between files, whats happening in them and how they are made, so that you can bring them together correctly.

We've covered the rotopaint node, and last week was about colour corrections. I guess it's hard also because, moving on from topic to topic one week to the next it seems as if its all flying by and it's alot to take in. Also, I think I made it hard for myself by looking through some videos to do with set extensions and projection set ups...some huge scenes and node structures. I think this is the part of Nuke Im most interested in...the 3d compositing side of it, but thats some of the more advanced stuff I guess, which I should leave for a bit further down the line. In two or three weeks, the basics of that will be covered on the course Im doing.

I think i just needed a rant as it seems like it's been alot to take in!

Do you use Nuke alot Hammer, at your work?
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Old 12-11-2010, 04:31 AM   #4
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damn We use after effects here at the office and its really user friendly

I hear nuke has a really stiff learning curve but hey if you got maya down im sure you can manage this
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Old 12-11-2010, 09:38 AM   #5
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Yes I use it a lot... Perhaps not loads. We only use nuke now, shake is rarely opened. I guess I was lucky to learn shake as they are very similar. It made it easier to pick up nuke.
I still don't know loads about nuke, but I can do what I need to for my job. A bit like Photoshop, I can paint a texture map but would propably make a crap jumble sale poster.

btw, I think there are some nuke tuts in the free tutorials section on the escape website.
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Old 12-11-2010, 12:26 PM   #6
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Murambi...Yeah, i'd agree with the learning curve. I was thinking yesterday of the zbrush issue that some people have, getting used to the interface and the workflow, and I thought that there was some similarity. Its been interesting actually, because the little video compositing Ive done, and by compositing, I mean basically layering layers and CC-ing them, I've done in After Effects. But I have never understood most of what all those tools and effects were about in the effects panel. But having been looking at Nuke, when going back into After Effects I see that some of them are kind of the equivalent functions, and even back in Maya, math utilities like multiply/divide etc, each program has its own equivalent, so hopefully learning Nuke will also teach me stuff which will help me understand more about other programs.

Hammer: I guess that must have helped alot knowing Shake already. One of the assignments we've had to do this week has been learning about the shuffle and copy nodes. I stopped myself walking away from the computer several times yesterday in frustration before it started becoming clearer. Had a curious sense of triumph once Id got there. Basic motion tracking, corner pinning and shot stabilization to go this week.


I'll keep those escape tuts in mind
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