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Old 06-03-2011, 04:20 AM   #1
bullet1968
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Default Kailani's new timber cot....help

Ok guys...now that the missus is in her prime battle mode...I have been roped in to 'varnish' or 'stain' the new girls cot. So...I am in the process of sanding back the bulk areas with a belt sander with 120 grit...didnt want to go much harsher..thought an 80 would mark it...anyway it seems to be doing fine. Now I do Google a lot etc etc but does anyone know if there are any 'special' ways I have to prep the raw timber when I stain it?? I was going to go for a stain without varnish...but should I still varnish it?? to seal it or something...any help would be nice. Here is a video..sorry for the poor quality...and Bundy the superdog had to have a cameo...he he he he
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Old 06-03-2011, 08:47 PM   #2
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couldn't grok much from the video but I'll give ya the basics ....

1. wood prep: 80/100/120 is good for removal of old surface materials, once finished wipe all pieces with either water or denatured alcohol and let dry (longer if you use water)
this will clean wood and also raise the grains.
Once dry, resand using 180/220 to remove scratches and marks left by rougher paper
wipe again with either water or denatured alcohol and let dry.

With furniture, never have sharp edges/corners, especially with children, so either do a bevel or a round over (1/8" or 1/4" would be enough)

finish: you can stain, or not , depends your preference......
if using a solvent base stain (alcohol/petroleum) you need to let pieces dry and air out for 36-48 hours to get rid of solvent gases, else the gases will blister your varnish/finish
and the gases would also be bad for newborn/children...

There are food safe stains and oils out there, used on salad bowls, etc)
I would strongly suggest looking for those brands/products at local woodworking/hobby shop.
Most food safe oil finishes last longer than varnish/shellac/lacquer, more durable, and easier to reapply as time demands.
Also, they will give the wood a richer colour, negating the need for stains unless you're trying to match something else.
Whatever you use, you'll need at least 2-3 coats for a proper seal and finish of the wood.

hope that helps.
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Old 07-03-2011, 12:28 AM   #3
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Mate!!! that is bloody helpful! thank you so much...yeh I am making sure all the corners are bevelled for sure...I know how clumsy kids (and me) can be LOL. Wow I didnt know about the food safe oils man...thank you for that mate...I will look out for them at Bunnings and see if they have them...if not..to the hobby shop!

Thanks again for your help mate

cheers bullet
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Old 07-03-2011, 01:42 AM   #4
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glad that helps a bit
here is some more info for you:

a site explaining the different oil finishes:
http://www.finewoodworking.com/Skill....aspx?id=26893



since you're in Australia, here is a site where you can preview the different items, and buy online if desired:
http://www.thewoodsmith.com.au/thewo...swoodsmith.htm

from personal experience I would use either the Rustin's Danish oil or Rustin's Worktop Oil
and FYI, teak oil, tung oil, and walnut oil will all darken the wood pieces a little so don't be surprised.
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Old 07-03-2011, 11:49 PM   #5
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Sweet mate!!! man you are a pearler of information...thank you again so much.
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