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Old 07-06-2004, 09:05 PM   #16
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The biggest problem for me is choosing what industry i want to end up in. Hopefully i start my animation degree in just over a year and i still haven't chosen. Game or Film?
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Old 07-06-2004, 09:21 PM   #17
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Reimo005

Dude, the chance to take on industry jobs when someone 'just' happens to offer you one dont come by very often, most of us have to work our bollocks off in order to even get an interview,
my advice to you would be dont question it, get in there, and do it even if you start at the bottom. Also regarding whether or not you are good enough shouldn't even cross your mind, your friend obviously thinks you are!!!

I'll take if you dont......LOL , get in there!!!

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Old 07-06-2004, 09:48 PM   #18
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Wow, I can't believe I didn't see this thread before now. Guess I've been spending too much time animating. :p I'll try not to repeat too much of what was already said (all good advice).

First off, about me. I'm a freelance animator in the game industry. I've been working on games for the past 6 years and have 9 shipped titles on my resume. I originally got hired at a game studio called Dynamix right after I graduated and worked there as an animator for 3 years until it was closed by its parent company Sierra. For the past 3 years, I have been doing all freelance work.

Doing freelance work is a mixed blessing. On one hand, you have the freedom to (mostly) pick and choose what you want to work on, and you set your own work hours. Working from home is nice as well, since I get to actually make full use of all the stuff I spent money on.

However, freelance work also means constantly being on the lookout for new contracts, managing business-related matters, handling clients, and, most important of all, forcing yourself to stay on track on your own without a boss looking over your shoulder. Freelance work is not for everyone. It takes discipline, motivation, and perseverence to survive as a freelance artist. I've been fortunate thus far, but it can be touch and go sometimes.

No matter what field or job type you get into, your portfolio and/or demo reel are the most important things in terms of getting you the interview. People often forget this. Your demo reel is not meant to get you the job. It gets the prospective employer's attention and gets you in the door for an interview. The interview is where they decide whether or not they like you and whether or not you are a good fit for the company.

Realistically, anyone can do the work. There are thousands of people out there doing what we do. What it boils down to is who you are as a person. If you have a great portfolio/reel, but you're an ass, no one is going to hire you. They don't care how good you are. If you're going to be a pain to work with, they won't want anything to do with you.

Bottom line is, as has already been said many times in this thread, stick with it, work hard, and constantly try to improve on your skills. It takes hard work and perseverence to survive in these industries. Don't give up. Sometimes it takes time to get the first job. Once you're in, it's a tad bit easier.

OK. Dissertation is done for now. :p
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Old 07-06-2004, 11:01 PM   #19
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wow...
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Old 08-06-2004, 11:47 AM   #20
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Jango

Thnx, I give it a shot and try to get in. Hopefully I have enaugh time to work and go to school at the same time
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Old 09-06-2004, 04:59 PM   #21
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My question would be what standard do you have to reach before being considered good enough to get a job in the industry?

My modelling skills have improved a lot from the beginning days but I am wondering how much more they have to improve?

I know there is no definitive level but an approximate standard?
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Old 09-06-2004, 05:55 PM   #22
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I'd also be curious to find out the demand for people doing visual effects or compositing, as opposed to just 3d modelling, lighting, texturing, etc.
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Old 09-06-2004, 09:51 PM   #23
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Hey CB

Thats a good point. I think you should set your own standards as high as possible, because you'll never get a feel of it until someone sees your work and gives you an opinion and says 'Yeah I like it but.....' kind of like these forums, it a good way of getting a feel for how you are working, so then you go away tweek your stuff and come back knowing you have done your best and then see what happens. You'll look back in a year or so and say Nah ,Did I do that shit, cos I know I do!!

What I'm trying to say is basically do your absolute upmost and show your passion for what you do because eventually someone will say 'give that man a job', they'll see you have what they want. Look at the stuff that some of the big guns on the web do, aspire to do stuff as good as that and better, I think as long as you keep observing and practising your craft you'll get there, standards for each company are different. I would just kill to work at ILM and work on the stuff they do but I have to keep working and trying my best until someone says 'let him in' I wont give up!!

Hope this doesn't bollock on too much......

Jango
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Old 01-07-2004, 07:25 PM   #24
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Default horses for courses

http://www.escapestudios.co.uk/

im not plugging anyone... but....
Recieved this email today for courses (Located in London, UK)
and thought i'd share the link, if anyone has another website link, i would like to see it... just to compare prices... maya comp 10 week course with the above link was about £7k..


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Old 02-07-2004, 12:51 AM   #25
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This is a great thread, I don't know how I missed this either. I am not in the industry "YET" but I hope to one day. I'm currently taking some courses in Maya in the US for the summer, and then I'm heading back up to Canada when I'm finished.

It's great to hear from people who are working in a 3d related field. It always encourages and inspires me to work harder and to be patient. I would be interested though in seeing the reel's that got you your interview or "foot in the door".
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Old 02-07-2004, 01:05 AM   #26
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I didn't have a reel. Just my website portfolio.
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Old 02-07-2004, 10:35 AM   #27
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maya comp 10 week course with the above link was about £7k..
You can do a master degree in this field for less than that which lasts a year and will give you a better understanding than a 10 week maya course!! and it's better respected as well!

ncca.bournemouth.ac.uk
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Old 02-07-2004, 08:52 PM   #28
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pure morning

had a look and i think to take on a masters degree you already need to be trainned in cg and have a honours degree...

whereas the other trng isn't dependant on previous experience, although i do hear what you saying about the 10 weeks bit - you can only learn so much in that shourt time...

btw - that challenger - sweet as - ive just seen one in the flesh and thought of your model straight away...

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Old 02-07-2004, 09:18 PM   #29
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Tim_T

Like Mike I didn't have a reel, I just had photoshop work!!! No 3d at all!!!
Hows that for pure luck??
Now I'm doing Maya full time!!!

_J
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Old 03-07-2004, 12:10 AM   #30
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For whats its worth, i'd rather invest my time doing an art degree rather that a 'software package' based degree.

I plan on doing a BA Drawing degree to build a fundamental foundation, then maybe followed by a Computer Animation Master [probably at Bournemouth] in order spruce up my self-taught digital skills.

Although Maya is my favoured choice, i woundn't want to spend so much time training in a specific package as i might not want to branch off to others. Some studios dont use commercial software, and others, especially smaller ones, may not use the one you've trained in. I'm sure alot of studios use many diffrent packages, thus giving you a choice, but i wouldn't want to live on that hope.

More importantly i dont want to learn how to do somthing specifically in a package...

...I want to learn how to 'animate', not how to 'animate in maya'.
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