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Old 29-05-2009, 09:30 PM   #1
petersrin
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Default Multi-shot workflow

I am creating a space battle between two ships over a world with two moons.

I am intimately familiar with several workflows for live action production of a multi-shot scene.

I am completely in the dark when it comes to common, effective workflows for animated production of a multi-shot scene.

I have done searches here and google for ideas. None. This is what I had in mind:

1) Model/Texture
2) Animate sequence... perhaps the first act of a scene.
3) Create the cameras needed to make your storyboard happen.
4) Render temp footage according to storyboard with a few overlapping frames for editing choices
5) Revisit 3-4 for all "sequences" in the scene
6) Assuming the film is only one scene long, render full res shots with same overlapping frames

This is a very loose, inexperienced workflow. Looking for A) alternatives, or if it is actually similar to normal workflows, B) expounding on my proposed workflow.
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Old 30-05-2009, 09:44 AM   #2
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you will need to be intimately knowledgeable about animation if you want the camera shots to look real unless you are using a locked off camera.

best you understand these rules or find an animator.

M

PS, or look for 'milo tools' script.
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Old 30-05-2009, 06:46 PM   #3
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My director has an excellent eye for shots and so do I. If camera techniques in the real world translate well to animation (which I believe they do, since vfx used to be done physically and therefore were completely bound by "real world" rules), then we should have an excellent base on which to develop our shots. Of course, I understand that a camera move rarely works with, say, pure linear f-curves and I will have to pay very close attention to HOW the camera gets from A to B.

Milo looks impressive.

What I'm still baffled about is WHAT is done WHEN... animation, I assume, is at least blocked out before camera moves are built. Do you make multiple cameras in the scene? Do you key in the cuts to one camera? These details of workflow will help me as I approach the project. Thanks.

If there are any extra tips into camera movements other than USING film-like pivots, implications of weight, etc, please let me know.
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