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Old 09-04-2007, 10:27 AM   #1
GameSeeker
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Default What do i need to know?

I have been a Maya user for sometime know and i can build models mesh them together texture a bit, and thats fun and all but begin a guy concidering a Video Game Propession i would like to know more.

To be specific i want to know what other skills aside from Maya i should know.

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Old 09-04-2007, 10:13 PM   #2
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Maybe I'm wrong, but what I've seen, I think it depends on what specifically you want to do. ie, modeling, animating, lighting, special effects, etc. I look at end credits now and it doesn't seem like one person does it all.

I'm guessing the first step is to decide what you specifically want to do. Then, do some research on the requirements for that job title. You should be able to search google for game companies and search those companies for job descriptions/requirements. They may tell you what software they use, what skills each job requires and so on.

That's just what I'd do if I had that question. Good luck!
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Old 10-04-2007, 01:12 AM   #3
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I'm not working in the industry, but i think you should be as alround as possible to get more of a chance, since you can apply on different functions.
You could also focus on one thing, modeling, texturing, scripting and so on and once your in learn the other stuff(in your spare time).
make a good demoreel and i don't think it should be more than 2 a 3 minutes.(i think those demoreel-watchers have a short attentionspan :p )
and most important keep trying

good luck

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Old 10-04-2007, 01:15 AM   #4
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While it is important to know where you want to go and what you want to do, it never hurts to have a bit more knowledge than you need.

If you are able to get a job at a larger company, you might work in a pipeline and be responsible for only a few tasks. If you are going to get a job at a smaller/lesser known company, you might have to be responsible for a multitude of tasks; this includes, but is not limited to any combination of:

Concept Art, modeling, rigging/weight painting/animation, UV layout and texturing.

What's more, there are many "disciplines:"

Environmental artist; are you responsible for the concept/design, modeling and texturing of landscapes and architecture?

Character modeler; are you going to be the one to conceptualize, model, texture, rig, animate, etc...living beings? Cars/vehicles can replace the "character" term above, if you are working on a Need For Speed type game.

Prop modeler; will you make some miscelaneous items in games, such as chairs, tables, crates, machinery and other decorations ("lesser" models, but nonetheless important in making a believable environment)? Some things might even be considered "environmental" objects, here.

Visual (particle) effects; might you make the flashey, sparkly explodey stuff for games?

Again, it's up to what you want to do, but it never hurts to know as much as possible.










...is "explodey" even a real word...?
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Old 10-04-2007, 01:20 AM   #5
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Are smaller companies easier to get into? Or does it just depend on the current market at the time?
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Old 10-04-2007, 02:59 AM   #6
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It can depend on the market, but "easier" depends quite heavily (almost entirely) on the individual and their skill(s).
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Old 10-04-2007, 12:22 PM   #7
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Thanks everyone for your replys.
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Old 10-04-2007, 09:34 PM   #8
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I recommend taking a look at Gamasutra for more information on the game industry as well as a list of current job openings around the world. That'll give you a better idea of what companies are currently looking for in potential hires.
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