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# 1 08-02-2012 , 08:06 PM
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Render settings question

1. So I see this drop down menu with a bunch of options.

https://i43.tinypic.com/qybkeq.jpg

I usually use Production quality when I render but I wanted to know what all the others do?

2. And I set my AO render colors to white and black but I still see a lot of grain in my renders. i set my samples to 72 and my resolution to 1k square plus 300 resolution but I still see too much noise/grain. Do I just keep cranking my resolution?

Thank you


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# 2 08-02-2012 , 08:21 PM
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1. Don't know what they do. I've never used the presets. If I were you I would learn about the render settings. Start with anti aliasing.

2. Are you increasing the samples on the ao node?
Don't render 1k square. Having a square image will just give you a boring composition. Also stick with 70dpi if that's what you increased.

# 3 08-02-2012 , 08:41 PM
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HOW do i learn about the render settings??

that's why i posted this


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# 4 08-02-2012 , 08:56 PM
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The render presets will give you varying levels of quality just by automatically changing the other render settings. You don't get any new variables in the presets beyond what is in the render settings window. Some of the values the presets change are the anti-aliasing values, whether GI, caustics, motion blur etc. are on or off.

One way to learn would be to change the preset and see which settings get changed. Then look up the setting (e.g. anti-aliasing) if you don't know what it is.

Or come back here to ask about a specific setting.

Edit: Also, increase the samples to reduce AO noise.

# 5 09-02-2012 , 11:05 PM
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How many samples would you suggest?
I crank it up to 72

Also how do i stop the AO bleed like the whites mix together in the render even if there are two different objects next to each other?


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# 6 10-02-2012 , 05:27 AM
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learning render settings you need to spend time on it. production settings preset always render in good quality but it also depends on the mesh, shadows, shaders, and textures. default settings of production gives good result making shadows edges softer but then if you want some bounce in the lighting you can further work with FG and GI. So overall if you want a good quality rendering following are the main points that you should always take care of;

1.) Max Sample Level (raytrace/scanline quality drop down menu)
2.) multi pixel filtering
3.) raytracing(values of reflections refractions and shadows)
4.) final gathering (in indirect lighting tab)
5.) point density and point interpolation ( in final gathering settings)

keep max sample level to 3.
in multi pixel filtering use Gauss , value = 2.5 by 2.5
in raytracing keep values for reflections = 10 , refr4actions = 10 shadows = 20 (skip refractions if there are no refractions in your scene)
in final gathering , point density = 10 and point interpolation should be 50-100.

and i would like to know how you are rending AO?

# 7 10-02-2012 , 06:31 AM
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in multi pixel filtering use Gauss , value = 2.5 by 2.5


I admit I don't know much about rendering settings, but Lanczos 4x4 gives me the nice sharp edges. I guess it depends what you're going for. (You can get the sharp edges by disabling multi-pixel filtering in software rendering).

2)
There's an AO tut here: https://simplymaya.com/autodesk-maya-...=180&sub_cat=0

It's using render layers, not MR, but I'm getting nice effect from it, no grain. btw. the whites are alpha channel.. they disappear once you composite it on the original image, so does it matter if they bleed?

# 8 10-02-2012 , 08:57 AM
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HOW do i learn about the render settings??

that's why i posted this

Oh I don't know maybe you change values and note down what happens. Maybe you google thing you don't know like anti aliasing. Maybe you use the help files. Maybe you look at the types of filters and find out what they do.

# 9 10-02-2012 , 09:13 AM
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Im with you Dom you should use the forum when you are stuck on some thing or need advice on how to do some thing, would be here all day answering the original question.............dave




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# 10 10-02-2012 , 10:06 AM
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The op asked a fair question. This is the newbie and basic's forum after all.

# 11 10-02-2012 , 11:46 AM
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yeah but like dave said, its a big question which is open to lots of interpretations.
The render settings should be based on what you are rendering. right?
So saying something like change this to 4 and set that at 2 doesn't work. you need to learn why you are setting something to 4 or something to 2.

# 12 10-02-2012 , 02:53 PM
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Geez ..what a merry bunch.

Anyway here's a basic guide: https://area.autodesk.com/userdata/fo...GPW49V3hFT.pdf

I don't think it's very helpful to learn about rendering by changing a value after value and re-rendering as a lot of the changes will be very hard to notice if you don't know what you're looking for and some will only affect specific effects that you might be missing in your scene. On the other hand I agree that it's a huge topic, so just pick one value and ask about it, unless you want to get slaughtered here.. user added image

# 13 10-02-2012 , 03:37 PM
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geez yourself.
the question was asked about presets. i said learn about render settings and you wont need the presets and got a sarky reply.
changing value after value is exactly how you should learn about rendering. its not like you have to render a beauty pass every time. just 3 lights and a sphere will do. it wouldn't even take much time.


Last edited by honestdom; 10-02-2012 at 03:50 PM.
# 14 10-02-2012 , 07:46 PM
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I don't really know what to say here. I think the preset names do a pretty good job of explaining what they do. They're supposed to be a jumping off point. Dom's original answer was pretty appropriate, then the question changed.

If you want to learn about the render settings, then you can start with "Help>Render Settings" menu at the top of the render settings window. There's a ton of info on all the different tabs.

Personally, I think the "production" preset is just overkill on the raytrace settings in many cases. And if someone doesn't understand the basics then bringing FG settings into the conversation is only going to muddy up the waters further.


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