Integrating 3D models with photography
Interested in integrating your 3D work with the real world? This might help
# 1 02-03-2007 , 09:24 PM
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lighting pointers

Hi

I have been playing with maya for a few weeks now and have been getting the hang of modeling. I have only realy created a few fully rendered scenes as I am not too hot on how to light them. I never get a realistic look? I guess part of the whlole aspect is creating a suitable enviroment for the model. something else which I am not clear about. Do alot of you use HDRI maps to light your scenes or indivudual lights?

any help with general points how to make lighing a generic scene ( like say a simple object sitting on a table) look realistic is much appreciated.

regards
robin

# 2 03-03-2007 , 06:48 AM
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Hello,

I made this tutorial for another simplymaya user. It covers basics of 3 point lighting, light linking etc. in order to make the image below. It's always best to have some understanding of setting up actual lights.

Right click and save target as THIS LINK (19 Meg-ish)

Hope it helps,

Mat.

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# 3 03-03-2007 , 12:23 PM
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thanks man il give it a shot and get back to you with my result or problems.

is it a video or just audio as all im getting is the audio?

cheers


Last edited by rcb25; 03-03-2007 at 02:02 PM.
# 4 04-03-2007 , 04:36 AM
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you might need to download the divx codec... (www.divx.com)

oh wait it's a wmv file... lemme try it first.

no opens fine. check out divx just to be sure...


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Last edited by NeoStrider; 04-03-2007 at 04:39 AM.
# 5 04-03-2007 , 05:49 AM
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nice tutorial mat! i enjoyed watching it, although i must say that area lights do make for nicer renders (usually through raytracing with raytracing shadows) that area lights do increase render time. spotlights do as well a job as long as you maintain that the cone angle. area lights factor in the actual size that you scale it to, but spot lights only factor in the position, intensity, angle, and cone angle... with a slower computer (or less ram) they tend to render faster, but it all depends on what your hardware is capable of...

first i must say that i've been lighting according to what i've learned from my film/animation classes... it might not be accurate from a 3D aspect, but it works in regular film - as in lighting real subjects - be they human or material.

these measurements usually are (again, from what i was taught) according to (or in measurement from) the camera used.

the key light is usually raised above the subject, and is around 45 degrees to the left or right of the subject (your model). the fill light is about 60% to 30% of the intensity of your key light, and is around 90 degrees from your fill light (on the opposite side of your fill), and is either on the same level or lower than your key. since you're working in 3D, usually the key casts the shadows and the other two do not... but sometimes the fill can provide a decent secondary shadow (because it's a dimmer light). the backlight (or rim light) is usually directly opposite the camera (directly behind the subject) in order to create a highlight which defines the silhouette of the subject from its background or surroundings. keep in mind, if you're lighting a figure that moves around then the three point lighting method becomes more of a theory, ensuring that you are able to pull your subject from your background as you see fit. if you're just trying to showcase your model, then mat's provided an excellent way to do so without learning the other rendering methods. the area light does provide with a softer shadow (depth map settings no longer matter after you've enabled raytracing), but it does add to render times. also, the area light creates a more interesting highlight on your model, but if you think it takes too long to render, consider a spotlight. either way, mat's done a really good job showing you how to make a decent render in a small amount of time (without depending on defaults and mental ray). nicely done.


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# 6 04-03-2007 , 05:53 AM
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Yeh I thought it might be the divx codec but mine is up to date and im still just getting audio. I have a mac and have the flip4mac plugin installed that should allow quicktime to play wmv files!?! never had this problem before.

# 7 04-03-2007 , 05:58 AM
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thanks guys that does explain a few things and gives me a starting point!

much appreciated

# 8 04-03-2007 , 07:37 AM
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Cheers,

it never crossed my mind that you might have trouble with the codec, I hope you sorted it (I know nothing about Macs!).

Glad you liked the tutorial Neo, you are right to point out that 3 point lighting is really for use showcasing an object rather than lighting a scene.

I would like to think that anyone who watches it will try out other attributes on the lights and expand on the lesson that I gave as it is a very basic first step into lighting.

Take it easy,

Mat.

# 9 05-03-2007 , 06:23 AM
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hey mate cheers for the tutorial

this is my attempt at recreating your effort without being able to see what you were doing and just listening to you haha

I not get a feel for how to light and show off my models in a very nice and simple manner.

cheers

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# 10 05-03-2007 , 06:58 AM
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if you want to see what happymatt is doing try downloading the VLC player. Just put in google and you'll find it very easyily.

cheers for posting that tut, -just what I needed

whooops, VLC doesn't play ad my windows media player won't play it either. user added image I'm using a mac as well wht codec/compressor did you use happymatt?


Last edited by farbtopf; 05-03-2007 at 07:08 AM.
# 11 05-03-2007 , 07:04 AM
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yeh i have vlc and it still doesnt work. not too sure whats going on here..

# 12 05-03-2007 , 07:09 AM
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just noticed myself... seems to be a mac issue

# 13 05-03-2007 , 07:09 AM
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just noticed myself... seems to be a mac issue

# 14 05-03-2007 , 07:40 AM
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I've used the Windows Media Video V9 codec, perhaps it's only for use with PC's. I use it because it compresses really nicely, I'll see what I can do regarding a more Mac friendly option.

Nice attempt without even seeing the images Robin!!

Cheers,

Mat.

# 15 05-03-2007 , 11:56 AM
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user added image


user added image 10x for the tutor i like it ... and i learn smth for light .... :bow:

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